Other Treatment Modalities for Recurrent Miscarriage


Some of the modalities discussed below can be quite successful in achieving a healthy pregnancy in cases of recurrent miscarriage.

Treatment for antiPhosphoLipid antibodies

There is some evidence that if you have aPL antibodies and a history of recurrent miscarriages, treatment with low-dose aspirin tablets and low-dose heparin injections in the early part of your pregnancy may improve your chances of a live birth up to about seven in ten (compared to around four in ten if you take aspirin alone and just one in ten if you have no treatment).

Even with treatment, you will have a risk of extra problems during pregnancy (including pre-eclampsia, restriction in the baby’s growth and premature birth). You should be carefully monitored so that you can be offered appropriate treatment for any problems that arise.

Steroids (certain sorts of natural or synthetic hormones) have been used to treat aPL antibodies in recurrent miscarriage, but they do not seem to improve the chances of a successful delivery and they carry significant risks for you and your baby, compared with aspirin and heparin.

Treatment for thrombophilia

Although you may have a higher risk of miscarriage if you have an inherited tendency to blood clotting (thrombophilia), you may still have a healthy and successful pregnancy. At present there is no test available to identify whether you will miscarry if you have thrombophilia. You may, though, be offered treatment to reduce the risk of a blood clot.

Tests and treatment for a weak cervix

If you have a weak cervix, a vaginal ultrasound scan during your pregnancy may indicate whether you are likely to miscarry.

If you have a weak cervix you may be offered an operation to put a stitch in your cervix, to make sure it stays closed (cervical cerclage operation). It is usually done through the vagina, but occasionally it may be done through a ‘bikini line’ cut in your abdomen, just above the line of the pubic hair.

Although having a cervical stitch after the third month of pregnancy slightly lowers your risk of giving birth early, it has not been proved to improve the chances of your baby surviving. Because all operations involve some risk, your doctors should only suggest it if you and your baby are likely to benefit. They should discuss the risks and benefits with you.

Hormone treatment

It has been suggested that taking progesterone or human chorionic gonadotrophin hormones early in pregnancy could help prevent a miscarriage. There is not yet enough evidence to prove whether this works.

Immuntherapy

Treatment to prevent or change the response of the immune system (known as immunotherapy) is not recommended for women with recurrent miscarriage. It has not been proven to work, does not improve the chances of a live birth and it may carry serious risks (including transfusion reaction, allergic shock and hepatitis).