Is There Any Treatment For Recurrent Miscarriage


Is there any treatment for recurrent miscarriage?

Supportive antenatal care

Women who have supportive care from the beginning of a pregnancy have a better chance of a successful birth. There is some evidence that attending an early pregnancy clinic (if there is one in your area) can reduce the risk of further miscarriages.

Screening for abnormalities in the structure of your womb

You should be offered a pelvic ultrasound scan to check for and assess any abnormalities in the structure of your womb, so that they can be treated if necessary.

Another method of screening using hysterosalpingography (an X-ray of the fallopian tubes using fluid injected through the entrance of the womb) has no advantages over pelvic ultrasound and causes more discomfort, so it is not usually necessary.

Screening for genetic problems

You and your partner should be offered a blood test to check for chromosome abnormalities; the test is known as karyotyping. If either or both of you turn out to have an abnormality you should be offered the chance to see a specialist called a clinical geneticist. They will tell you what your chances are for future pregnancies and will explain what your choices are. This is known as genetic counselling. It can help you decide what you want to do for the future.

If it seems likely that other members of your family could be affected by the same problem, they too may be offered genetic counselling.

Screening for abnormalities in the embryo

If you have a history of recurrent miscarriage and you lose your next baby, your doctors may suggest checking for abnormalities in the embryo or the placenta afterwards. They will do this by checking the chromosomes of the embryo through karyotyping, although it is not always possible to get a result. They may also examine the placenta through a microscope. The results of these tests may help them to identify and discuss with you your possible choices and treatment.

Screening for vaginal infection

If you have had miscarriages in the fourth to sixth month of pregnancy or if you have a history of going into Labour prematurely, you may be offered tests (and treatment if necessary) for an infection known as bacterial vaginosis (BV).

If you have BV, treatment with antibiotics may help to reduce the risks of losing your baby or of premature birth. There is not enough evidence to be sure that it makes any difference to the chances of a baby surviving.